Stories by Katie Paine

Strange Times Bring Big Changes to How PR Crises Need To Be Handled

September 1st, 2020 by

The pandemic and social unrest have made their mark on crisis management, Katie Paine argues. She makes her case with examples from Jerry Falwell Jr and the university he formerly ran and Rio Tinto, the minerals conglomerate that put profits over public perception when it destroyed sacred lands.

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Hearst, ‘Ellen Show’ Crises Highlight Need to Align Brand with Reality

August 4th, 2020 by

Both The Ellen DeGeneres Show and Hearst publications were caught flatfooted after allegations appeared in the media that their brands’ values failed to equate with reality. In her regular Image Patrol feature, Katie Paine analyzes the slow response to each PR crisis and provides tips for how brands should handle such issues.

Cruise Lines, Care Facilities Fail After COVID-19 Media Attention Arrives

May 5th, 2020 by

Our crisis communications columnist Katie Paine assesses the responses to the coronavirus-related media attention from elderly care facilities and the cruise line industry. She finds the messages of both groups missed the boat.

George Springer

Delaying Crisis Response: The Astros vs Beijing’s COVID-19 Cover-up

March 1st, 2020 by

Measurement guru Katie Paine compares China’s cover-up of the coronavirus and the Houston Astros’ long delay before admitting guilt in the sign-stealing scandal. Neither entity helped its reputation when it chose to ignore a crisis. Prompt response and owning your mistakes still makes the most sense.

Boneheaded Benchmarking: 2019’s Worst PR Flubs Offer Plenty of Lessons

January 7th, 2020 by

Our crisis and measurement columnist Katie Paine looks at 2019’s worst crises. She also offers lessons learned from what she sees as the year’s top PR crises. The overarching theme is that a “boneheaded” CEO’s approach to crisis can ruin a company’s reputation, trust and financial standing.

The UAW and GE: Silence Breeds Mistrust, Action Conveys Commitment

September 1st, 2019 by

The United Auto Workers (UAW) and General Electric Corp. (GE) took different paths in their crisis response. GE spoke out quickly, questioning accusations of an Enron-like fraud. More than that, its CEO invested $2 million of his own money into the company. The UAW, however, has barely addressed the fraud charges some of its leaders have faced. Its membership is getting restless.

The DR, Deutsche Bank Attack Crises Differently, But Get Similar Results

July 1st, 2019 by

This month Katie Paine looks at two crises in organizations that couldn’t be more different. First she analyzes the so-called mysterious deaths of Americans in The Dominican Republic; then she looks at scandal-plagued Deutsche Bank. The two took different crisis management approaches, though both ended up with similar results.

Rushed to Market: Boeing Stands Firm on 737, Samsung Delays High-Tech Phone

May 1st, 2019 by

Measurement guru Katie Paine provides her take on Boeing’s (737 Max 8) and Samsung’s (Fold phone) crisis-management strategies. Her verdict is that neither company did a good job, though the negative implications seem to be lighter for Samsung.

Botched Responses: Patriots Issue Quick Denial, Huawei Chooses Charm

March 1st, 2019 by

Veteran PR guru Katie Paine looks at the crisis responses of the New England Patriots and the Chinese company Huawei. She gives neither one of them a passing grade.

Botched Crises of 2018 Show the Need for Speed, Transparency in 2019

January 1st, 2019 by

2018 was a blockbuster year, but only if measured in the number of boneheaded moves brands and executives made time after time. The surfeit of poor crisis responses has provided myriad lessons that should be used in 2019, Katie Paine argues.