Stories by Arthur Solomon

The Luddites of our Craft: Crisis Tips for the New England Patriots

February 26th, 2019 by

One-size-fits-all is great for some things, but it rarely works when managing a PR crisis. Recent evidence is the statement the New England Patriots issued when its owner was caught in a sting operation. Uttering a quick denial of alleged wrongdoing is a bad move unless you can back up your statement with facts. Better to say you’ll wait to comment until more facts are available and move on.

PR Lessons Learned from the 2018 Political Scene

December 31st, 2018 by

Veteran PR pro and former journalist Arthur Solomon offers the second of his two-part series about the valuable lessons communicators can learn from federal government communications. Pulled from 2018’s headlines, the examples he uses offer lessons in ethics, crisis and other PR activities.

Good and Bad Lessons for New PR Pros from Political Talk Shows

October 26th, 2018 by

You’ve no doubt heard the PR maxim, “Act like a reporter.” Veteran communicator Arthur Solomon offers tips on how to do that using the backdrop of cable’s political talk shows and broadcast networks’ nightly newscasts. He also provides advice on the best ways to write pitches and press releases.

What New PR Pros Can Learn from Watching Political Talk Shows

August 31st, 2018 by

The political talk shows take a lot of criticism. In fact, they can be a great way for new PR pros to supplement their knowledge base. The major takeaway, argues veteran PR pro Arthur Solomon, is to learn how not to speak and write like the pundits who populate these shows.

How to Get a Tuition-Free Crash Course in Media Relations, 2018 Edition

May 25th, 2018 by

Watching the political scene can provide PR pros with a tuition-free course in media relations, argues veteran communicator Arthur Solomon. His 2017 columns about political communicators’ missteps were some of our most popular. He’s back with more lessons from the first half of the 2018 political season, including this gem: If you crave loyalty at work, bring your dog to the office.

3 Questions to Consider Before Launching Your PR Career

April 13th, 2018 by

A career in PR can be many things. Usually one thing it is not is the glamorous, party-hopping profession portrayed in movies, television and novels. Sometimes PR pros are asked to represent brands whose positions on social and political issues they abhor. In other cases they’re asked to lie to protect the brand they represent. Veteran PR pro Arthur Solomon offers three questions aspiring PR pros should ponder before making their career choice.

How PR Pros Can Ensure Better Interviews for Brand Executives

March 1st, 2018 by

Anything said during, before or after an interview can appear in a story. In fact, anything said anywhere can end up being reported. Hope Hicks found out that even what you tell the House Committee on Intelligence behind closed doors can end up being reported.

PR Lessons Pulled From 2017’s Crisis Headlines

December 21st, 2017 by

Veteran PR pro and former journalist Arthur Solomon continues his series of communications lessons pulled from 2017 news headlines. In this edition, Solomon concentrates on lessons learned from crises that involved Equifax, BP and the White House.

Six PR Lessons Pulled From 2017 Headlines

December 14th, 2017 by

The veteran PR pro Arthur Solomon begins his annual review of lessons for communicators pulled from the year’s headlines and news reports. In this initial installment, the lessons involve crisis communications, media relations and internal communications. There’s also advice about the best way to handle a difficult boss.

How to Get a Tuition-Free Crash Course in Media Relations, Part III

October 24th, 2017 by

In what he promises will be the final installment of his series on how watching the political scene can provide PR pros with a free, crash-course on crisis management, Arthur Solomon emphasizes the importance of telling the truth. While it might not help you keep your job, telling the truth about a situation or a person can keep you out of costly legal jeopardy, he argues.