Stories by Katie Paine

shutterstock_502429909

Burger King and the EPA Wrestle for Crown of Worst Crisis Communicator

July 1st, 2018 by

Often organizations try too hard to either capitalize on hot news topics or avoid them altogether. Neither strategy is particularly effective. Our resident crisis and measurement guru Katie Paine takes a look at Burger King’s whopping disasters overseas and how the EPA’s attempts at staying out of the headlines have backfired royally.

shutterstock_793567579

Ambien Loses No Sleep on Roseanne; Purdue Pharma Hooked on 80s Crisis Tactics

June 5th, 2018 by

Katie Paine looks at how two crises were handled. Sanofi’s Twitter retort to Roseanne Barr’s shot at Ambien for allowing her to create insensitive tweets and Purdue Pharma’s missteps at the outset of the situation and its close-lipped handling of the OxyContin-addiction mess. In the end, every compelling narrative needs a villain, Paine writes

VP Biden hires communications director.

Tesla, White House Correspondents’ Assoc. Stumble Through News Cycles

May 8th, 2018 by

Brands and organizations can rest on their laurels no longer. Even darlings of the media and Wall Street, such as Tesla, are prone to crises these days. Katie Paine looks at how Tesla and founder Elon Musk and the White House Correspondents’ Association handled recent crises.

e427f721-what-happens-when-kfc-runs-out-of-chicken-it-admits-it-fckd-up-640x480

KFC and Oxfam Take Different Paths to Crisis Resolution, Honesty Triumphs

March 20th, 2018 by

Katie Paine compares crises at Oxfam and KFC in her regular Image Patrol feature. In this edition she explores how transparency and even humor can be prime tactics for managing crisis.

Crystal-ball

A Look at PR Metrics That’ll Fade in ’18, and Which Will Dominate

January 16th, 2018 by

Katie Paine takes a look at what’s ahead in 2018 and sees a sobering return to reality, with more realistic measurement leading the charge. She also sees more bots in our future as well as fewer choices for those companies seeking help with measurement.

CrisisAhead

In an Unprecedented Year, Multiple Mistakes Earn Equifax Top PR Crisis

December 19th, 2017 by

Our regular crisis measurement guru Katie Paine considers crises of 2017 and selects the crisis of the year. Can you guess which brand has the dubious distinction? Hint, the brand was handed an awful situation, partly through its own negligence, and then sat on the situation for several weeks before announcing it to the public.

like-it-or-not-mark-zuckerberg-is-now-silicon-valleys-ambassador-to-the-rest-of-the-world

Facebook’s Russia About-Face Is Costly; So’s Equifax’s Crisis Avoidance

October 3rd, 2017 by

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg is eating crow as the situation with Russian ads on Facebook has amounted to more than the nonsense he called it initially. Equifax, of course, has committed nearly every error possible in terms of its early crisis management to its summer data breach. Katie Paine grades the two brands’ crisis response efforts.

President Trump

Crisis Report Card: Merck CEO Moves First; Kaspersky CEO Gets Blustery

August 22nd, 2017 by

Katie Paine grades the crisis response of Merck, whose CEO took a stand against the President that eventually led to the downfall of two White House advisory groups, and Kapersky Lab, which whiffed when its integrity was questioned.

shutterstock_576622717

How USA Gymnastics Excelled at Handling a Harsh Investigative Report

July 17th, 2017 by

In her latest installment of Image Patrol, Katie Paine looks at how USA Gymnastics is handling its sexual scandal and contrasts it with Bell Pottinger’s mishandling of its crisis concerning an account from a South African company with ties to that country’s president.

shutterstock_155403761

A Tale of Two Apologies: Colbert’s Authenticity Works, Fyre’s Hype Fails

May 15th, 2017 by

You don’t have to look far to find examples of people and organizations screwing up. So as tempting as it may be to pile onto Uber’s woes or the latest airline mess, Katie Paine uses this edition of Image Patrol to look at the follow-up to crises. What you do is very important, but so is how you respond, ie, the way people and brands say they’re sorry – or don’t.