Should PR at Least Listen to Khadafy?

Amid a report from the NY Post that Libyan dictator Moammar Khadafy is looking for a New York-based PR firm to refurbish his government's reputation, the question arises: should or will any PR rep answer the call?

It's not that a few PR agencies haven't done this type of work before. And apparently Libyan government officials have backup materials in written, audio and video forms that help their case—or so they say in their pitch to New York and London-based agencies. So what would hold PR agencies back from at least? While the pay could be high, there's something called "reputation" plus the ability to get new clients in the future that could be deterrents.

1 Comment

Deals of the Week

Get $150 Off PR News' Social Media Summit

SMS web ad 180x150Join PR News at the Marriott Marquis in New York on Oct. 5 for the Social Media Summit, where expert communicators will share in-depth case studies from their social efforts. You'll be immersed in the strategies and tactics that you can apply right away.

Use code “150” at checkout to save $150 on the regular rate.

Get $50 off PR News' Crisis Management Guidebook


Crisis management is an art, not a science. In this edition of PR News’ Book of Crisis Management Strategies & Tactics, you will discover many different views on this art, and you are certain to find takeaways that will transform the way your organization handles crises. 

Use code “50off” at checkout.

Save $100 on a PR News Subscription



Let PR News become your weekly, go-to resource for the latest PR trends, case studies and tip sheets. Topics covered include visual storytelling, social media, measurement, crisis management and media relations.

Use code “SUBDEAL” at checkout.

  • Aaron Biller

    The problem:Flight 103 over Lockerbie and accountability in a post-Mubarek world