Care to be Called a ‘Public Communications’ Pro? Give it Some Time

In it’s latest 10-K filing, Yahoo ceased calling itself a “premier digital media company” and opted for a “global technology company focused on making the world’s daily habits inspiring and entertaining.” A bit verbose, but we get the point. The move revives a question about an issue that's been bandied about in the PR field for the last several: Does "public relations" best describe what communications really is and does?

So we took a quick poll on PR News' website, asking the question: If PR agencies were to stop using the term "public relations," what would be the best alternative? With 128 communicators voting, "public communications agency" (43%) won by a margin over "marketing communications agency" (42%). Trailing were "social marketing agency" and "content marketing agency," 9% and 5% respectively.

While it's probable that the term "public relations" will be with us for quite some time, its integration with marketing, social media platforms and growing connection with the C-suite may eventually result in a different type of language to describe the role that communicators play.

What about you? Have an alternative moniker for PR? We'd like to hear abot it.

Follow Scott Van Camp: @svancamp01
 

  • http://www.microsourcing.com/ MicroSourcing

    Interesting survey. Social media and other tech developments may cause publicists to re-think the way they define PR. “Public communications agency” as a term doesn’t stray too far from PR, though it doesn’t capture the way tech developments are affecting the discipline.