Quick Study: Reputation Index Features Long-Established Brands; Girls Perceive Glass Ceilings Blocking Leadership Roles


â–¶ Rep Index Focuses on Performance, Citizenship: Global brands have more work to do to close the gap between their performance in the marketplace and their citizenship, according to the Global Corporate Reputation Index, released by Burson-Marsteller, Landor Associates, Penn Schoen Berland and BrandAsset Consulting. The Index focuses on two sets of attributes that drive corporate reputation: performance and citizenship. Index highlights include: • A sampling of 10 of the 25 brands with the best reputations include Adidas, McDonald’s, Nike, Avon, Apple, Nokia, Canon, Nestle, Bosch and Microsoft. • Great reputations are built over time: 20 of the top 25 companies were founded before 1950. The top companies have an average age of 87 years, suggesting that the ability to withstand the test of time translates well into overall reputation. • Consumers in China award the highest reputations of all the markets in the study, while consumers in Japan and Brazil are the most critical of companies. • The banking industry scores lower than nearly all other industries on overall reputation. However, there are notable regional differences, with banks suffering the most on both performance and citizenship in the U.S. and Russia, while scoring comparatively stronger in China and Brazil. Source: Burson-Marsteller â–¶ Girls Look for Leadership Role Models: A study commissioned by Girl Scouts of the USA in partnership with Gfk Roper could provide PR opportunities for brands targeting girls. The research finds that while girls are generally optimistic about their futures, they still see glass ceilings in today’s society that will get in the way of achieving their leadership potential. Based on a survey of 1,000 girls aged 8-17, the study found that close to three in five girls think that a woman can rise up in a company but will only rarely be put in a senior leadership role. Off of these findings, Girl Scouts has launched the ToGetHerThere campaign to fund opportunities for girls to lead. Other study highlights include: • 59% of girls say that it is easier to be a follower than to stand out as leader. • Almost 40% of girls are not sure if they are cut out to be a leader. • The majority of girls believe family responsibilities weigh women down more than men as they attempt to advance in their careers. • 81% of girls believe the workplace could do a better job of meeting the needs of female employees. Source: Girl Scouts/Gfk Roper

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