Quick Study: Analog Catalogs Had Big Influence on Holiday Shoppers; Nature of Brand/Consumer Attachment Probed


â–¶ Holiday Shoppers Influenced More By Paper Catalogs: Here’s some food for PR campaign thought—paper catalogs influenced both in-store and online holiday retail purchases more than social media platforms. According to Baynote’s December 2012 Holiday Online Shopping Survey, which took the pulse of 1,000 consumers, paper catalogs influenced 81.9% more in-store purchases and 42.9% more online purchases than Facebook. Other results include: • Paper catalogs influenced twice as many consumers as both Pinterest and Twitter, for both in-store and online purchases. • Social platforms were most influential to consumers between the ages of 25 and 34, while paper catalogs were most influential among consumers 45 years and older. • Consumer preference for tablets was most pronounced when browsing websites in search of products to purchase; while 40% of tablet owners (or 21.9% of all respondents) used their device for browsing, only 28.4% used smartphones. • Consumers between the ages of 18 and 44 were most likely to make a purchase using a mobile app (32% did so), while consumers 45 and older were least likely (just 14.1% did so). Source: Baynote â–¶ Love Thyself, Love Thy Brand: What happens to us when the brands we favor come under attack? To probe the nature of this attachment between brand and consumer, Angela Lee, a professor of marketing at the Kellogg School of Management, Monika Lisjak, a doctoral candidate at the Kellogg School, and Wendi Gardner, an associate professor of psychology at Northwestern University, set up experiments in which participants critiqued a pair of brands that have seen their share of controversy: Facebook and Starbucks. The findings include: • Self-conscious, low-self-esteem subjects who said they liked Starbucks initially rated the company more favorably after they had read a critical editorial about it. • People who were set up to feel defensive and who identified highly with the brand either were not at all affected by the negative editorial, or they actually upped their opinions of the brand. • Given the chance to bolster themselves by being part of an in-crowd, Northwestern students were asked to rate students and faculty at the university, as well as students and professors at another university, on measures such as intelligence and likelihood of success. This time when they gave their opinions of Starbucks, their sentiments were not as favorable. By expressing a more favorable opinion of the students and faculty at their own university compared with those elsewhere, the low-self-esteem individuals regained their equilibrium and no longer defended the brand. PRN Source: Kellogg School of Management

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