6 Business-Meeting Do’s, and 6 Absolute Don’ts

dos_dontsSo you have a major meeting this week. Let’s say it’s a really important client meeting. You just landed a big account, and now you’re working out the details of who’s going to manage what. Or maybe the corporate communications department is tasked with implementing a social media and earned media campaign for a new branding initiative. It could even simply be an important cross-department meeting on employee relations.

The details differ, but the stakes are always the same. This is strategically important. It always strikes me as odd, then, that behavior in meetings is like the Wild West. It’s remarkable how norms for meeting etiquette vary so much. It depends on the company culture, and even on senior person present. I’ve seen people on their computers and phones for extended periods when they’re in meetings with the CEO. Or with a client. Wait, who—or what—is more important than that? I’ve seen people leave sales calls and return 10 minutes later—to me that’s absolutely unacceptable.

I’ve seen senior managers ignore or forgive favored folks for that kind of behavior while getting upset at others. A lot of the cues come from the managers, and too often, the managers are too busy with other things, or other agendas, to enforce decorum.

So here’s my list. Basically, as a communications pro, you should always behave in a meeting as you would if you were on the agency side and meeting with a prospective client or, if you’re in-house, with your C-suite.

Here are the do’s:
• Come prepared with ideas.
• Pay attention at all times.
• Do more listening than talking. You learn more, and people who withhold comment until they have something really important to say only enhance the importance of what they’re saying, because they’re perceived as deliberate and wise.
• Don’t interrupt. (There are at least two exceptions: When you’re the boss and someone is droning incessantly. When you’re a participant and the speaker is factually incorrect and droning incessantly.)
• Sit up straight.
• Take notes, but don’t take them on your computer because you look like you’re on e-mail.

And here are some don’ts:
• Don’t open your computer and give the screen more attention than the meeting.
• Don’t engage with your phone for e-mail or anything else.
• Don’t conduct side conversations.
• Don’t leave the room unless absolutely necessary.
• On conference calls, don’t mute the phone and do other tasks.
• Manage conflict well. If you’re debating, always offer a solution.

What other important items of business-meeting etiquette are there? What rules can you share?

—Tony Silber
@tonysilber

7 Ways to Shake Up Your Routine This Week

Yoga2At a yoga class the other day, the instructor excitedly and in a heavy whisper told us she was going to shake things up a bit. “We’re not going to do the same moves you’re used to.” I peered down the hall at the Spinning class and contemplated rolling up my yoga mat and making my way there. I am glad I stuck with yoga that day because it not only stretched my limbs, it challenged my mind in new ways beyond the 60-minute class.

The instructor was nervous about these changes and kept apologizing: “Sorry, but no Downward Dog today!” It was all about Child’s Pose. “Be a Warrior,” she declared, as she implored us to just forget about Mountain Pose today. The Seated Twist was totally new to this class, and you could hear the grunts over the soothing music. “I hope you’ll forgive me for requiring a different path today. I only wish it gets you thinking about what routine you may change in your life this week.”

It was a Sunday and I decided to take her literally. From Yoga I went grocery shopping and started my excursion in reverse – Aisle 18 (milk and eggs) rather than my typical starting point of fruits and vegetables, Aisle 1.

I had a spare half hour for a manicure. Instead I got a pedicure and selected a nail color that my 10-year-old niece would have chosen for herself.  My yoga instructor would either be proud or appalled.

Later that night, I made my to-do list for the coming week. I put family things first on this list, then work items, and within the work to-do’s I listed only 2 things (rather than 10) for each day. I handed the sticky note to my husband to check it out. “Why are you showing me this?” he asked. I said, “Because I never show you my to-do list.” It was not exactly a romantic moment, but it was different.

At work, there are a lot of ways to shake up your routine. I’m not referring to barging into your boss’s office and asking for a raise, throwing your old computer on the floor demanding a new one, or launching a new product for a new audience. I’m talking about the little things you can do to rejuveniate, to challenge your muscle memory and to think of your day’s work in different and possibly more creative ways. This week, consider these changeups:

1. Walk down a different hallway to your office or cubicle: you’ll run into colleagues you normally don’t interact with and see areas of your work environment you never pay attention to.

2. Discard one item for every year you’ve worked at your company – pieces of paper you know you’re never going to read or need, items gathering dust, old plasticware. (Crumbs don’t count.)

3. Go to a competitor’s Web site, find something great there, and share it with your team in a positive, non-defensive way.

4.  Favor a different social media platform: if you spend the bulk of your social media time on Twitter, for this week spend more time on Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Google+ or LinkedIn. Post, respond, join a conversation.

5. Ask a colleague if you could shadow him or her for a few hours. Assuming this will be kosher with the highers-up, consider spending 120 minutes with your IT guy or 120 in Accounting; or a few hours with Marketing.

6. Go to lunch with a colleague you don’t know well.  It might not sound appetizing, but chances are you’ll find common interests and learn something new about her and your company.

7. Write with pen and paper: Send a thank you note to 3 people: one person you work with, one customer or client, and someone who’s influenced you in your career. Don’t forget to mail it.

Just as my yoga instructor got me thinking in new ways, I hope this list will inspire you to shake up your routine and start to see new things in your environment and different ways of approaching work.

And with that, Namaste.

– Diane Schwartz

Find your way to my Twitter @dianeschwartz

 

3 PR Lessons from the Redskins Controversy

For communicators following the latest wrinkle regarding the Washington Redskins’ controversial name, it’s your basic PR blocking and tackling.

On Wednesday a federal board cancelled the team’s trademark registration, calling its nickname “disparaging to Native Americans.”

While the ruling puts a bit of a squeeze on the Redskins’ bottom line—the Redskins and the NFL are now limited to pursue legal action against those who use the Redskins’ name and logo on T-shirts, hats and other merchandise—it doesn’t force the team to abandon the name.

Even though the writing seems to be on the wall, Redskins owner Dan Snyder is defiant, saying he would never change the name.

“We’ve seen this story before,” Redskins attorney Bob Raskopf told the New York Daily News. “And just like last time, today’s ruling will have no effect at all on the team’s ownership of and right to use the Redskins name and logo. We are confident we will prevail once again.”

According to the News, a previous revoking of the team’s trademark in 1992 was locked up in the legal system until 1999 on appeal. A group of Native Americans brought the original suit. But the team and the NFL won the appeal in federal court.

However, unlike 1999, there’s now a groundswell of support to put the Redskins’ name to pasture. For example, a sector of the United Church of Christ voted Saturday to urge its 40,000 members to boycott the Redskins, while half of the U.S. Senate recently wrote letters to the NFL demanding a name change.

Snyder has every right to fight the ruling. But from a PR standpoint, the Redskins are probably on the wrong side of history. The issue also raises some fundamental questions for communicators who have a responsibility for managing their brand’s reputation.

> They don’t call it “evolution” for nothing. Controversial names (or icons) that once caused a collective shrug may now spark consternation, hence the Washington Bullets changing their name to the more benign Washington Wizards in 1995. Demos change. So, too, do consumer perceptions, which PR pros have to pay very careful attention to, lest they start to lose touch with reality.

> The court of public opinion often trumps the court of legal opinion. Synder could emerge victorious in court, but that would not stem the erosion in the Redskins’ brand (or Synder’s personal reputation). In this case, a legal victory would be a hollow one.

> Know when to cut your losses. So long as the protests against the Redskins’ name persist, the communications team will be forced to spend an inordinate amount of time defending the namesake and less time getting the brand’s other message out. Such a case also serves to, in some ways, denigrate the PR role. Rather than take a leadership position, PR pros will have to defer reporters’ question to the Redskins’ legal department. There’ll be fewer opportunities to tell a different story—stories that can renew trust in the organization and remove the suspicions that are now surrounding it.

Follow Matthew Schwartz on Twitter: @mpsjourno1

9 Social Media Tips that You Can’t Afford to Overlook

If you weren’t at the PR News Social Media Summit last week, I forgive you. But really, you should try to attend an upcoming conference of ours because you are going to pick up a lot of unique, sound and creative tactics and strategies  – what we like to call “stealable ideas” – that will move your PR and marketing efforts forward more than a notch. I must confess that I am engaging in shameless content marketing as I write this blog post. I get very excited after one of our PR News events and want to share some (not all!) of the gleanings from the day’s event. So herewith I present 9 really smart social media tips to get your week off to a #greatstart. These are made possible by our outstanding summit speakers, attendees and sponsoring partners.

  1. Best quote of the conference: “No one wants to be friends with a butter cracker.” Kathryn Sheaffer, brand manager for Ritz Crackers, so aptly summed up the challenge of Facebook communications for brands. Be realistic about your brand’s presence on social media and engage with your fans in realistic ways.
  2. Get a few social platforms rights, then start to take chances on others. In other words, don’t dive into the entire social media pool. Pick a few lanes to swim in first, be it Twitter and Pinterest, or Linkedin and Facebook, master your strokes there, then start exploring other waters.
  3. Take your press release off cruise control. First of all, the press release is not dead. But the old-fashioned press release should be put out to pasture. Make sure your releases are optimized for search, have multimedia components that drive stakeholder engagement, are written well and most of all, are interesting!
  4. Tweet short: A tweet that’s less than 100 characters lifts share rate by 17%. You thought 140 characters was short? Think again.
  5. During a crisis, Twitter is for news and Facebook is for hugs.  Don’t mix it up.
  6. Great question posed to the audience: Why don’t PR pros do more A/B testing with their campaigns? Smart advice from Brandon Andersen of Cision, noting that A/B testing goes to the heart of Marketing 101 yet the PR discipline often overlooks this smart exercise in testing your messaging, be it on social media or in a traditional PR campaign.
  7. You cannot automate judgment. With all the talk of data mining, programmatic and cloud-based communication, the truth is that people still drive decisions.  Make sure you put a premium on good judgment when hiring talent and executing on campaigns.
  8. Content marketing is a commitment not a campaign. Most brands are engaging in some type of brand journalism and the jury’s out on how well it’s working. Those committed to content marketing, weaving it into their marketing-PR matrix rather than a one-off campaign here and there, are most likely to succeed in this area.
  9. Visuals are the new headlines. A picture is worth a lot more than 1,000 words. Invest in video, infographics, photography and graphics. Take time to learn about Vine and Instagram. See what your audience is seeing and then give them some of that.

I hope you’ll heed a few of these tips and let me know how it goes for you. Also feel free to add a kernel of advice below.

– Diane Schwartz

Let’s connect on Twitter: @dianeschwartz

 

 

The Yin and Yang of Social Media

I love Yelp. Not because I’m a foodie or a big restaurant goer, but for its reviews.

Whatever the establishment—whether it’s a new Bobby Flay creation or garden-variety diner—you can easily find wildly divergent views of the same restaurant, which makes for some entertaining reading.

For one person, the meal is so deliciously good that it’s as if he died and went to food heaven, while another person, who ate at the very same place on the same night, crows about how the Potatoes au Gratin were ice cold, the roasted chicken was way gamey and, oh yes, the waiter spilled wine all over the table.

Reading the comments on Yelp is like a massive Rorschach test, with subjects’ perceptions and interpretations running across the board, and back again.

It’s a similar syndrome with regard to social media, in which one person says it’s the greatest thing since canned beer while another may curse its very existence.

We’ve got ample evidence on the disparate views of social media— and whether it truly enhances the value of PR and communications— via a recent PR News/Cision survey on the state of social media for communications professionals.

We asked PR pros what’s the best/worst thing about social media, and the comments were all over the map, even contradictory.

Here’s a sampling:

The best things about social media:

>  You are able to connect with people virtually everywhere.

>  You’re able to place your information out at a specific time of day.

>  Two-way communication that results in trust and enhanced relationships.

>  The ability to build relationships with customers and even strangers that can become customers.

> The ability to get your word out to so many people at no cost.

The worst things about social media:

> While the numbers seem huge, actual reach is often very small.

> There’s way too much of it. Too much content that isn’t relevant.

> Hard to measure and hard to define ROI.

> I can’t find our customers.

> It appeals most to a demographic that has no purchasing power for my products.

Perhaps it’s the aperture with which you view social media. Maybe it depends on whether you look at life as a glass half full or half empty.

There are no right or wrong answers here. But social media is not going anywhere. It will evolve and change, like the rest of digital PR, and, most likely, become an even greater force in marketing communications. The trick is to make it work for your brand or organization, despite any budgetary or operational limitations.

See more survey results.

Follow Matthew Schwartz on Twitter:  @mpsjourno1

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