The Landline Telephone Has Some Ring Left

Posted on March 6, 2014 
Filed Under General

Is the landline telephone headed for a museum near you?

It increasingly seems that way, what with more and more people wedded to their cell phones and myriad hand-held devices.

If landline phones do get mothballed, though, so, too, will what remains an effective communications tool for PR pros.

But we may be getting ahead of ourselves.

Despite the country’s increasing dependence on the Web, consumers who have landline phones still thought that their home phones would be harder to give up than social media, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

That’s just one aspect of a larger survey, titled “The Web at 25 in the U.S.,” which took the pulse of 1,006 adults living in the continental United States. According to the survey, 28% of the respondents (who have landline phones) said it would hard to give up landline phones, as opposed to 11% for social media.

At the same time, the number of U.S. households that have landlines fell to 71% in 2011, down from 96% in 1996. Follow that stat to a logical conclusion and, within the next 15 years, the landline telephone may be considered exotica from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Sure, PR pros can call reporters and editors from most anywhere on the planet.

Whether you’re on a cell phone or a landline, it’s important to convey to the person your calling that he has your undivided attention. During the analog era, with a landline, that was easier to convey because with the exception of a pay phone, you had to be indoors and in a relatively quiet place.

While it’s hip in technology companies not to have landline telephones in their offices, my guess is that, for PR pros, picking up a landline to call a reporter about a story is becoming a novelty.

And being novel begets curiosity.

For reporters and editors, that’s half the battle. Now you can close the deal with a relevant pitch to the reporter’s audience(s).

Follow Matthew Schwartz on Twitter: @mpsjourno1

 

Comments

Copyright © 2014 Access Intelligence, LLC. All rights reserved • All Rights Reserved.