Make Sure Newsjacking the Super Bowl Doesn’t Turn Into a PR Fumble

Posted on January 21, 2014 
Filed Under General

Super Bowl XLVIII is now set, with the Denver Broncos pitted against the Seattle Seahawks. But brand managers and PR pros have been scrambling for weeks if not months to come up with the most effective way(s) to align their message with the big game.

Indeed, throughout the next 10 days or so, expect to see more so-called “newsjacking” than you can shake a stick at. Newsjacking—which has become another PR tool borne of the digital age—is leveraging the popularity of a major news story to highlight your products and services and brand attributes.

One of the biggest newsjacking coups was during last year’s Super Bowl in New Orleans, when the lights went out and Oreo quickly posted a photo on Facebook with the caption, “Power Out? No Problem.” The picture, showing an Oreo cookie against a dark backdrop, had the tagline: “You can still dunk in the dark.”

Less than a day after the Super Bowl, the image had reportedly garnered more than 19,800 likes and more than 6,600 shares.

The newsjacking was a perfect PR play: Oreo was able to capitalize on the news that millions of people were at that instant talking about, while reminding consumers of the longtime appeal of Oreo cookies, which is dunking them in a cold glass of milk.

With this year’s Super Bowl being played less than 10 miles from midtown Manhattan, the media capital of the universe, there’ll be much more hype for the game than usual—and seemingly more opportunities for newsjacking.

While newsjacking can be an effective way to boost your brand and get your message out with relatively low cost, it shouldn’t seem forced, or the PR equivalent to trying to stuff 10 pounds into a five pound bag.

Considering that the game is one of the last instances in which we all gather “around the fire” to watch the same program, communicators can be forgiven for thinking that, by blending “creative” with some media buying and/or social media messaging, newsjacking is a surefire way to generate “earned” media.

But be careful what you wish for. As the Super Bowl approaches, there will be a strange sense that nothing else in the world is happening, as the excitement surrounding the game reaches a fever pitch. Yet after the game’s opening kick-off, it often feels as if the air has been let out of the marketing bag.

A study by research firm Communicus, for example, found that about 60% of Super Bowl ads it tested don’t increase purchase or purchase intent. The firm took the pulse of more than 1,000 consumers before and after they were exposed to the ads in the 2012 and 2013 games.

If Super Bowl ads have a tough time getting into the red zone with consumers, what chance do you have newsjacking the Super Bowl?

You can increase your odds, of course, by demonstrating a legitimate connection between your brand and the news at hand.

There are plenty of brands that can find ways to hitch their product to the Denver Broncos, Peyton Manning, the Seattle Seahawks or Russell Wilson, with regional brands having the best shot due to having a built-in audience and catering to local tastes.

However, national brands have to be careful not to do newsjacking just for the sake of doing so. They have to bring some value to the table and have a good (and fairly obvious) reason for why they’re aligning their message with the Super Bowl. It’s akin to showing up at a Super Bowl party with a gift that adds to the festivities and gets people engaged, rather than showing up with a six-pack of beer that is quickly consumed and all but forgotten a few minutes after you enter the door.

Follow Matthew Schwartz on Twitter: @mpsjourno1

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