New Year’s Resolutions for the PR-Minded

The good thing about New Year’s resolutions is that no one is really listening closely to what you are resolving to do.  But resolutions do crystallize our goals and make the month of January, at least, a little more interesting. For communicators the world over, you should expect 2014 to bring the following:

> Crises, smoldering or quick

> Reputations under fire or on fire

> Media coverage, for better or worse

> Employee morale issues

> Financial ups and downs

> Product and company launches

> Product and company failures

> A new social media craze

These are just a few of the sure things in PR as we herald in the new year and perhaps a new approach to PR.  In my nearly two decades covering Public Relations, I have never seen a bigger opportunity than now for PR practitioners to be the dominant force in brand leadership, message management and tying intangibles and tangibles to the bottom line.

There are many ways to not screw up this trajectory and to possibly make 2014 the most exciting year for you in PR. To do that, however, will take some commitment to the core tenets and practices of the best PR practitioners. Here at PR News we benchmark outstanding communication leadership across all areas of the market. From our Platinum PR  to our PR People Awards, from Corporate Social Responsibility to the Digital PR Awards, we see a pattern in excellence that underscores why resolutions are worth keeping.  Like many New Year’s Resolutions, the following list may sound familiar but I submit that the best ideas are worth repeating:

* Find the interesting story behind your message – and tell it

* Measure your PR and be bold enough to make adjustments

* Listen to your stakeholders: your customers, investors, employees are your keys to success

* Learn to work across silos – marketing, HR, IT, Finance, Legal

* Become a better goal-keeper:  of your goals, your department’s and your organization’s

* Collaborate internally and externally – 1+1=3

* Hone your writing skills: you reach more people when you can spell, turn a phrase and use your words correctly

* Foster diversity: in thought and experience

* Don’t fear missing out: resist the urge to be on every social media platform

* Be transparent: people are smart enough to see through the BS anyway

* Advocate for PR: become a voice for Public Relations inside your organization and in the marketplace of ideas.

What are some of your PR resolutions for 2014? Please share with your fellow PR News blog readers.

Best of luck to you and your team for a meaningful and memorable 2014.

– Diane Schwartz

@dianeschwartz

 

PS – Check out more of my blog posts from the past few months:

Beyonce’s December Surprise is a PR Masterpiece

Ten Tough Questions to Ask Yourself Now

Nine Tips for Public Speakers Who Hate Public Speaking

The Most Annoying Sayings: The Epic List

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Verbal Communications: The Underutilized Skill

There are certain people who even when they’re smiling warmly have a certain gravitas. They have a certain air that suggests intelligence, calculation, control, even as they engage the people around them. Bill Clinton has that. So does Denzel Washington. Oprah Winfrey. Colin Powell does, and Ronald Reagan did too. One thing that struck me about the photos and the movies of the late actor Paul Walker was that he had that quality as well.

Last week, at our annual PR People Awards presentation, our featured speaker was John Neffinger, co-author of the book, “Compelling People: The Hidden Qualities That Make Us Influential.” Neffinger’s talk was filled with specific, compelling points, all based around a simple premise: People judge other people based on two things, strength and warmth. Strength is the root of respect, and warmth is the root of affection. If you plotted both qualities out on an X axis and a Y axis, the ideal location would be the upper right quadrant, where strength and warmth are maximized. Any of the other three quadrants means a bad mix—either too much of one and not enough of the other, or too little of both.

Neffinger’s whole point was that this is the essential way all humans size each other up. And that only relatively few people ever master the ability to project both qualities at the same time.

And it seems to me that for communicators, especially those who spend a lot of time in public, representing the company—or interacting with employees, for that matter—that Neffinger’s counsel is important. Here are some highlights from his talk that are relevant to communicators looking to sync verbal messaging with non-verbal cues to convey both strength and warmth.

• Try to develop the knowing smile that the people mentioned above have. Neffinger describes is as “feeling the bottom eyelid.”
• Stand up straight. Posture is extremely important, but not used enough.
• Use poised but open gestures. Holding the hands up, Neffinger says, conveys warmth and openness. Holding them down conveys the opposite. Similarly, the chopping gesture with the hands conveys strength, as does holding an imaginary ball in hour hands while speaking.
• Replace all the “ums,” and “uhhhs” in your communications with silence. It’s more powerful.

What are the tools you use to project strength and warmth?

—Tony Silber
@tonysilber

Beyonce’s December Surprise is Public Relations Masterpiece and Lesson in the Halo Effect

Surprise!

Beyonce released her fifth album on Friday without advance notice and with much fanfare as 80,000 fans purchased her self-titled album within 72 hours of release on itunes, and if it doesn’t hit #1 this week then call me Stupid.

That’s right – Beyonce’s non-marketing marketing included no ads, commercials, media interviews, late-night hosting gigs. And to make matters more interesting and retro, customers had to do what they did decades ago – or never – and download the entire album rather than one song (until Dec. 20 when singles will be released).

Essentially, Beyonce relied on social media and the love, kindness and curiosity of her loyal customer base to spread the word. It is not surprising that it worked, is it? After all, Beyonce is one of the most popular celebrities in the Western World. By not doing what the marketplace expected, she generated more buzz than she ever could have created with a full-flung marketing strategy.

But let’s not worry about PR and Marketing being sidelined here. Make no mistake, there were communications pros behind this non-marketing, social media strategy. For one, she issued a press release with the album (that’s right: press releases are cool enough for Bey) and second, even though social media appears to be free, there were people behind the scenes tweeting, posting, pinning and monitoring.

The album has 14 tracks and 17 musical videos including collaborations with husband Jay-Z, and with Timbaland, Timberlake, Drake, to name a few. And daughter Blue Ivy Carter gets her second album credit before she’s out of diapers – a feat either incredible or disgusting, depending on your viewpoint.

It is worth studying Beyonce’s moves — marketing moves, that is. She is a master of her own image and understands how to engage with fans, keep her story interesting and be unpredictable. Though critics didn’t get to sample the album in advance, nearly all the reviews have been positive. This is the most compelling part of the December surprise: Beyonce orchestrated a triumph of both style and substance.

– Diane Schwartz

@dianeschwartz

Holiday Parties Can Be a PR Fact-Finding Initiative

The next two weeks are prime time for holiday office parties. Office parties are the few occasions when we gather with our colleagues but don’t necessarily feel obligated to talk shop.

They’re a license for people to lighten up from the daily and demanding grind. But for PR managers and directors, these gatherings are an opportunity.

The office holiday party may be the one time of the year that you get to take the collective pulse of the company, gauge the major concerns among the employees and harness those concerns into more effective communications.

With that in mind, here are a few ways the PR team can use the holiday party to enhance its service to the organization and build reputations and relationships for the company.

> Check the DNA of the company and determine which areas of the enterprise that fall under the purview of PR—say, the CSR plan, social-media guidelines or brand-ambassador program— may need to be revisited or reset altogether.

> Play the role of conduit by introducing C-level managers to the rank-and file, and vice versa. By doing so, you break down some of the inherent barriers in many corporations and better familiarize yourself with the entire communications ethos of the company and how people relate to one another.

> Listen, listen and listen some more. You seldom get a chance to meet with all your fellow employees and communicate with them in a no-pressure environment. So take perfect advantage of it by allowing your colleagues to do most of the talking. By listening (and asking sincere questions) you might learn about someone who has a talent (voice, design, videography) that can be harnessed for content creation, Web programming and other areas where PR shares ownership.

And more than that, uncovering hidden talents among team members provides you with new ways of thinking about the brand and how the company can behave more like a media company (regardless of what you’re selling).

With heartfelt apologies to Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter, once in a while you can get shone the light in the strangest of places if you look at it right. Start with the office holiday party.

Follow Matthew Schwartz: @mpsjourno1

Is the News Release Dying? Maybe That’s the Wrong Question

press-release-formatIn a Dec. 6 PR News webinar on writing relevant, share-worthy press releases, Myra Oppel, regional communications vice president for utility company Pepco Holdings, and Jana Telfer, associate director, communication science, for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tackled the thorny question of whether the news release is dying—or already dead. Their answer: it’s toast.

That is, if you’re talking about the stand-alone news release unconnected to a larger PR strategy, sent scattershot over the wires at a random time.

“The press release is not what it used to be,” said Telfer. “It doesn’t have the all-encompassing role it had in the age of typewriters. Nevertheless, a release provides an incredibly useful repository of information for journalists. You just have to be much more judicious and rigorous in how you use them.”

“News releases are evolving, the same way media is evolving,” said Oppel. “Releases have to be targeted and go to the right person. You’ve got to sell it hard with the email subject line, headline and lead. But releases will be perennials as long as there are journalists on the other end. They will still depend on them.”

That leads to another question. Let’s assume that the news release—properly structured and written so that each sentence adds value—will remain a useful, condensed repository of information for journalists. They will always need them—as long as there is a “they.” So the question should be, for how much longer will there be working, salaried, professional journalists who even know what a news release is?

Follow Steve Goldstein: @SGoldsteinAI

The Hunger Games at Work: How to Sound Very Fantastic This Week

HUNGERGAMESIt’s said that we speak an average of 16,000 words each day. That’s a lot of talking. As communicators, we appreciate fine words and clever turns of phrases.  But on this day after a long holiday, still recovering from a turkey and pumpkin pie stupor and constant conversation with distant relatives, I challenge you to insert into your dialogue or work- day imagination at least two of the quotes below from the blockbuster movie The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

On the surface, there’s little we can find in common between the roles of Katniss, Peeta, President Snow and Haymitch Abernathy and our role as communicators. But scratch just a little beneath that surface and you may find that the lines below could be very helpful as you get your week off to a fiery start:

“No waving and smiling this time. I want you to look straight ahead as if the audience and this whole event are beneath you.”  (possible scene: you are at a meeting with new competitors)

“Remember who the real enemy is.” (scene: at the meeting above you realize your competitors are not really your enemies)

“You’ve given them an opportunity. They just have to be brave enough to take it.” (scene: you give your team a challenging project to take on)

“Chins up, smiles on!” (scene: instead of ending your meeting with “OK, that’s all” you decide to shock the attendees with this uplifting, inspirational decree)

“From now on, your job is to be a distraction so people forget what the real problems are.” (scene: you’re moved from PR to HR)

“So far I’m not overwhelmed by our choices.” (scene: you’re at a business lunch at a restaurant with limited, unappealing menu choices)

“I wish I could freeze this moment, right here, right now, and live in it forever.” (scene: the media loves your story idea and you are inundated with interview requests)

“This is no place for a Girl on fire.” (scene: Katniss or someone similar to her shows up to your afternoon meeting)

“Convince me.” (scene: the response from your boss after asking for a bigger PR budget in 2014)

You might be thinking your job is not scripted nor are you an actor in a major motion picture. But after testing these quotes on your unsuspecting colleagues and peers you’ll realize that the Hunger Games isn’t as fantastical as originally thought.

– Diane Schwartz

(Join me on Twitter)

 

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