9 Tips To Master Before Your Next Media Interview

Posted on September 13, 2013 
Filed Under Crisis Management, Digital PR, General, Media Relations, Media Training, Social Media

When UPS wanted to make the public aware of its sustainability and energy-saving practices, the PR team knew it needed to tell an interesting story to showcase its efforts.  It has always stuck with me that UPS drivers don’t make left turns (or at least, 95% of the time, they don’t turn left). By turning right and not idling, UPS has been able to cut CO2 emissions by 100,000 metric tons and has saved 10 million gallons of fuel since 2004. The media loves stories like these, and I bet every company has a story to tell that’s illustrative and memorable. The hard part, it turns out, is not in identifying your story but in telling it smartly to the media. There are so many things that can go wrong on the road to positive coverage.

Jerry Doyle of CommCore Consulting Group spends most of his days training C-suite execs and PR pros on how to talk to the media, how to tell a story that resonates and how to stay on message. At a PR News Media Training Workshop in NY on Sept 10, he reiterated the importance of sticking to your message while respecting the reporter’s time and intelligence. He asked the workshop attendees: “What do you do when a reporter asks you a question?”  So many times, the interviewee changes the topic, or veers in another direction instead of actually answering the question. When you don’t answer the question, says Doyle, “it’s a tell” – in other words, skeptical journalists get more skeptical and the questions harden.

In preparing for your next media interview, keep these tips in mind:

  1. Always be tuned into WIIFM: “what’s in it for me” (the reporter and his/her audience): make your comments relevant to the interview and compelling to the audience.
  2. Pick a message/point and state it 3 times during the interview: any less or any more than that and your message will get lost.
  3. Research the reporter before the interview: who is she, what does she cover, what were her last 3 stories?
  4. Google yourself and your company: that’s what the reporter is doing before the interview, so don’t be caught off-guard by recent coverage of your company (or you).
  5. Assume you’ll be asked difficult questions: be prepared to answer them.
  6. Tell a story or provide an analogy: nothing’s better than a short, interesting story to illustrate your point, and for complicated issues a simple analogy is much appreciated by the reporter.
  7. Always answer the question: Better to say “I will look into that” than “no comment”.
  8. Have a bridging strategy: at times, you’ll need to bridge the conversation to get to your point. Practice bridging.
  9. Make sure your last words are good ones: often the last question is the reporter’s lead, the sound bite on TV or the most memorable answer, so make sure you end the interview on your high note.

A reporter is usually not trying to stump you, but no reporter worth his salt is going to throw softballs throughout the interview. If you can master the 9 tips above, you and your brand won’t suffer a black eye.

- Diane Schwartz,  @dianeschwartz

Comments

  • http://allpointspr.com/media-training Jamie Izaks

    I like the point about making sure to say a specific thing 3 times if you want the point to be noticed. This is good information for any PRP in a franchise PR firm.

Copyright © 2014 Access Intelligence, LLC. All rights reserved • All Rights Reserved.