The Epic List of Useless Words and Phrases (Continued)

UselessThere are many reasons people use clichés, catchphrases and trendy words of the day: it’s a communications shortcut, and for the most part it’s not illegal. Those are the only reasons I can think of. So, as in years past I present to you the Epic List of Useless Words, Sayings and Retorts. This is a working list that I edit as I live my days – I’ve removed many contributions from the last year (we’ve made progress!) but have added many new phrases (let’s not get cocky!). The list also includes contributions from PR News blog readers because we’re in this together.

While the list below may smell to you of sarcasm, it’s meant to be a fresh look at communication gone bad. It’s directional and subjective, honest and yet disposable. There are a few items in this list that could actually get you in trouble, depending on the time, place and your body language. For the most part, though, it’s just a reminder that as communicators we can always aim higher.

Feel free to make additions to the list – I’m sure this is not complete:

THE EPIC LIST

“To be honest with you” (Now I don’t believe you)

During a conference call awaiting a response: “Sorry! I had you on mute.” (pay attention!)

During a meeting: “Can I interrupt?” (what if you said No?)

“I think we can definitely do that.” (this response does not inspire confidence)

“Oh, Millennials!” (blame it on an entire generation)

I’m literally _________ (just remove the word literally)

“Hashtag No Way” or “Hashtag First World Problem” (cute if you’re in high school, but, um, grow up!)

“I am sooo busy!” (aren’t you special? No one else is busy!)

In a press release: “the leading solution provider…” (no reporter believes this about your company)

During a brainstorming session: “We tried that last year and it didn’t work.” (second time can really be a charm)

“It is what it is.”  (It is annoying)

“I personally feel.”  (redundant, redundant)

“You need to be more passionate.” (You can’t make people feel passionate)

The word “social” as a noun, as in, “Acme does social really well.”  (Being social means having friends, not selling product.)

“I’m a ____________ junkie.”  (Since when is addiction a virtue?)

“I’m just doing what I’m doing.”  (Redundancy will be the death of me.)

“We need to own social media.” (Um, the public owns social media. What you really mean is you need to tie your social media efforts to a bottom line, be it financial, social good or reputation.)

Guru (unless you are a spiritual leader or are the best of the best at something, find another descriptor)

“Going forward”  (Meaning “from now on” as if you could also dictate past behavior)

“No offense”  (Which means “I am about to offend you.”)

“I’m confused”  (Which means “You’re confused and I am going to set you straight.”)

Ideation

“Circle back”  (Which means to bring your Conestoga wagon back into a circle.)

“True that.”

“With all due respect…”  (Hearing that phrase, buckle-up: The words that follow will certainly bear no relation to “respect” or any recognized synonym.)

“At any rate…”  (It is so seldom used in connection with a literal rate of any sort.)

“To make a long story short” (already makes your story six words longer.)

“I don’t hate that idea.”  (Otherwise known as “let’s think about that more.”)

“We want to be in high-profile media”  (…said everyone on earth that wants to be in any media.)

“How should we spin this?”  (this is why PR’s reputation sometimes suffers)

“We need to be strategic.” (“Strategy” and “strategic” are so overused; no one explains what they mean by this, what the plan of action is or the tactics we’ll use to achieve the goal.)

“Let’s take a step back.” (It’s an early indicator that you are dealing with a conservative organization where innovation is outside their comfort zone.)

Irregardless (what’s wrong with “regardless”?)

Anyways (not a word)

“Don’t take this the wrong way/personally …” (well, now I am taking it that way)

“Out-of-the-box thinking”  (cringe!)

“If you will” (No, I won’t)

“Open the kimono” (creepy)

“Drink the Kool-Aid”  (just like those in Jonestown in 1978? I don’t think so!)

“Let’s talk offline”  (but I’ll call you on your line after this meeting)

“Boil the ocean” (clever by half)

Awesome

Awesome! (with or without !, better to not utter as a grown-up)

Ramp up. Tee up. Synch up. (Throw up.)

Factoids

Synergy (don’t use in press releases, unless it’s the name of your company)

“Run it up the flagpole and see how it flies.”

“Skin in the game”

“Ping me.” (check with HR first)

“I’ve got a hard stop at _________” (When is your soft stop?)

“We have a horse in this race.” (Less painful than one’s own skin the game, but same principle.)

“Kill two birds with one stone.” (poor birds)

“Give 110%”  (What is wrong with your math?)

Net-net (why both nets?)

“Put on your big girl panties.”  (for so many reasons, best to not say this)

Utilizing (try “using”)

Transparency  (Those who use this term are anything but transparent.)

From an agency exec to a client: “Of course, we can do all of that!” (sounds fishy, I don’t believe you; be specific on what you can do and what you might not be able to do. )

From a client to an agency rep: “I need a dashboard” (can you be more specific? Everyone’s asking for a dashboard and there are Mercedes dashboards and Pinto dashboards – which do you want?)

From an employee to her employer: “Where is my career going here?” (you should know, bring a plan to get there; don’t let your employer tell you who you should be)

From a CEO to his PR team: “Get us some good press.” And the PR exec’s response: “Consider it done.”

 

— Diane Schwartz

Let’s connect on Twitter: @dianeschwartz