‘I Think I Can’t, I Think I Can’t’: A New Train of Thought

The story about the little engine that could is a familiar and heart-warming one, a tale of a determined underdog fulfilling a difficult task against all odds. “I think I can, I think I can” is a commonly used refrain at challenging moments.

Sometimes, though, we might be stronger to think we can’t.  To admit, “I think I can’t. I think I can’t” and to seek help.

This idea was brought to light last week during PR News’ Top Women in PR Awards ceremony when keynoter JJ Ramberg, host of  MSBNC’s Your Business, reminded an audience of high achievers to ask for help without the fear of reprisal or embarrassment. The women who make up our 2015 class of top female communicators are a determined group that can relate to the little engine that took on the challenge of taking a stranded train over the hill while the bigger, more able locomotives refused.

I’m fairly certain that leaders of either gender know they can’t do everything well and will seek assistance every now and then.  Aside from having mentors to guide us, it’s imperative that we as communicators are also able to communicate our (momentary) weaknesses and our need for assistance. To occasionally ask for help from colleagues, peers, friends and new-found business connections is to acknowledge our limits, to learn from the assistance we receive and to pay it forward.

The next time you think you’re the little engine that could or the big engine that should, consider your options. Could you use a little help?

 — Diane Schwartz

@dianeschwartz