Know Your Letters: Spelling Variations Matter in Branding 


Lexicon study of more than 500 English speakers in the U.S. finds that when it comes to brand names, some spelling variations consistently and reliably communication specific brand attributes. The study findings include:

• Products whose names had double letters are more apt to be judged as having more features and capabilities. Thus, people are more likely to believe that a new smartphone called Zepp will have a more robust set of features than one called Zep.

• Double letters also invoke fun more than other words. Perhaps that’s why Larry Page and Sergey Brin chose Google instead of Gugle.

• The letter i is seen as more innovative than the letter y. For pairs of imagined brand names, such as a new laptop called Novix or Novyx, people believe that the version with i would be more innovative.

Source: Lexicon




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